So whilst I have to remove all of the furniture out of my small room to be able to use the HTC Vive, in the past it’s always been worth it with the reward of a Virtual realm awaiting me on the other side.

Since discovering the work of Justin Roiland late last year I’ve considered myself a fan. So, having demolished through the first two seasons of Rick and Morty in a two-day binge late last year, the prospect of getting to meet everyone’s favourite Doc and Marty doppelgängers seemed worth the half an hour of manual labour required to set the headset up.

Developed by Owlchemy Labs, the gets top marks for its writing, the witty character that the show produces is well executed in video game format as well. As a clone of Morty, Rick consistently makes sure you know how little your existence means to him, consistently insulting and mocking you throughout the short campaign. The voice acting feels just as off the cuff as its television counterpart.

Across the play area, which essentially stretches through various rooms of the Smith household, various tapes can be found which if played contain short segments of Roiland rambling on about a handful of different topics or recanting tales of the family’s past. Overall these add a nice touch to the game, their fun quirky vibe acts to reinforce the game’s overall tone.

various tapes can be found, which if played contain short segments of Roiland rambling on about a handful of different topics or recanting tales of the family’s past

In fact, the audio, in general, is pretty spot on. Towards the beginning of the game, you are sent to purgatory – a blank room dimly lit with red lighting and containing only a single telephone. Answering the phone the voice on the other end grows louder as you lift the Vive controller up to your ear, whilst his speech about the devil being otherwise engaged and hell being full is executed with the same clever charm that runs throughout the game.

his speech about the devil being otherwise engaged and hell being full is executed with the same clever charm that runs throughout the game

At times, however, my experience with Virtual Rick-Ality felt lacking. Whilst the feeling of being part of Adult Swim’s cartoon universe was incredibly impressive, there were moments where I questioned the actual gameplay. For the most part play time is taken up by doing monotonous chores for Rick, which whilst at first seemed a well-humoured joke eventually begun to get slightly grating. I have to put this down to the technology.

We find at the moment with a lot of VR games on the HTC Vive, that the technology often bounds their gameplay. The majority small parameters in which to play in due to the constraints of the consumer’s households. Whilst a few games attempt to push out into a more open VR world it’d be a struggle to name a title so far that has totally nailed the concept.

Whilst some areas of the game did feel a little task heavy that’s not to say that they weren’t still well thought out. Integrating characteristics of the show into the game such as the Mr. Youseeks ball which help you access areas outside the play zone at various points throughout the game felt like the developers were trying to think of ways to alleviate some of that monotonous chore-based feeling.

It was also refreshing to see that the game at times briefly allows you to move outside the house and into separate environments through Sanchez’s portal technology.

Overall, Rick and Morty: Virtual Rick-Ality offers an enjoyable couple of hours set inside the both charming and wacky animated space that fans of the show have known to fall in love with. The game looks to push the show’s character in wherever possible and is filled to the brim with humour throughout.

This copy of Rick and Morty: Virtual Reality was sent as a review copy via Evolve terminals. Our Editor-in-Chief, Jared Moore spent around 2 and a half hours being consitently reminded of his worthless existence by Rick Sanchez.

Review overview
Visuals - 80 %
Audio - 82 %
Gameplay - 71 %
Fun Factor - 74 %
Summary Rick and Morty's trip into Virtual Reality offers the same humour and charm that Roiland pushes into the show. At times the limits of VR push against the game's creativity which can leave areas of the game feeling like a list of chores.
76.75 %
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Jared Moore
Joint Editor-In-Chief at Quillstreak. Freelance Journalist studying at Newcastle University. Enjoys long romantic walks across the Mojave Wasteland followed by dinner with the Baker household. Once swiped right and killed a king.
http://www.quillstreak.com

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